Another TTP episode may happen1

While you can fully recover from TTP episodes, they may continue to happen during your lifetime. Learning what to watch out for can help you act quickly at the first sign of symptoms.

TTP recurrence1

TTP can be a lifelong condition. Even though it can be managed, it is normal to have at least one more TTP episode throughout your life, though some people may have many or only have one. Another episode of TTP is called “recurrence.” Depending on when a recurrence happens, it can also be called an "exacerbation" or a "relapse." You may hear your doctor use these terms interchangeably. Knowing the symptoms of TTP can help you recognize them so you can call your doctor right away when they happen. The most important thing to do when having another TTP episode is to get treated right away.

Jo

“If I could share one thought with someone who’d been diagnosed with TTP, it would be to look after—listen to your body, and if you feel unwell, go and get a blood test… Just keep an eye on yourself and don’t delay if you do feel you’re relapsing.”

–Jo, living with TTP

Understanding the TTP journey2-7

day

0

5

days

≤30

days

>30

days

day

0

TTP episode

5

days

Refractory TTP

  • This is when you don’t see improvement soon after starting treatment
  • It happens when the number of platelets in your blood doesn’t improve within 5 days of starting your treatment
  • This is not common (it happens in about 17% of people), but it is possible

≤30

days

TTP exacerbation

  • This is an additional episode of TTP that happens less than 30 days after you finish your TTP treatment because the immune system is continuing to attack ADAMTS13
  • If you are given only some of the available treatments for TTP or you don’t finish your treatments, this may happen to you. Exacerbations can also occur for other reasons than these

>30

days

TTP relapse

  • This is an additional episode of TTP that happens more than 30 days after you finish your TTP treatment
  • It is very common and is a lifelong risk for anyone with sTTP
    • Studies show up to 84% of people can have a recurrence

TTP episode

Refractory TTP

  • This is when you don’t see improvement soon after starting treatment
  • It happens when the number of platelets in your blood doesn’t improve within 5 days of starting your treatment
  • This is not common (it happens in about 17% of people), but it is possible

TTP exacerbation

  • This is an additional episode of TTP that happens less than 30 days after you finish your TTP treatment because the immune system is continuing to attack ADAMTS13
  • If you are given only some of the available treatments for TTP or you don’t finish your treatments, this may happen to you. Exacerbations can also occur for other reasons than these

TTP relapse

  • This is an additional episode of TTP that happens more than 30 days after you finish your TTP treatment
  • It is very common and is a lifelong risk for anyone with TTP
    • Studies show up to 84% of people can have a recurrence

If you experience any of these TTP recurrences, be sure to talk to your care team about your treatment plan to make sure you’re getting all the available treatments.

Ongoing monitoring can lower your risk of serious health problems1,8,9

Some people may never have another TTP episode in their lives, while others may have several.1 It is currently not clear why some people develop recurrences while others don’t. Any episode of TTP needs to be treated as early as possible. The earlier you can get treated, the lower the risk of serious health problems.

Ongoing monitoring involves 3 things:

Having regular check-ins with your doctor—even if you feel fine!—so they can monitor things like your bloodwork

Monitoring ADAMTS13 levels can help prevent recurrence.

During a TTP episode, the amount of ADAMTS13 in the blood is much lower than normal.
A decrease in ADAMTS13 can be a sign of another TTP event.8

Your doctor may monitor your ADAMTS13 levels as a way of deciding whether you need treatment to help prevent a recurrence. If you’ve never had an ADAMTS13 check after leaving the hospital, be sure to ask if you should have this test as part of your ongoing monitoring.

Saida

“After discharge, I was actually followed on a weekly basis and I had the bloods tested every week.”

—Saida, living with TTP

Knowing the symptoms of TTP and recognizing them when they happen to you8,9

Symptoms of TTP can include:

Knowing the symptoms of TTP Knowing the symptoms of TTP

Knowing the triggers of TTP

Potential triggers of TTP can include:

Personal health conditions, including cancer, HIV, and lupus

Certain treatments and/or medicines

Infections

Pregnancy